Intervention with parental agreement

 Graphs

Number of children subject to intervention with parental agreement, by Indigenous status, Queensland, as at 30 June, 2009 to 2013 Number of children subject to intervention with parental agreement, by Aboriginal and Torres Islander status, Queensland, as at 30 June, 2016 to 2020

YearIndigenousNon-Indigenous
2008 460 1030
2009 949 1872
2010 905 1675
2011 744 1212

Rate of children subject to intervention with parental agreement, per 1,000 children aged 0-17 years, by Indigenous status, Queensland, as at 30 June, 2009 to 2013 Rate of children subject to intervention with parental agreement, per 1,000 children aged 0-17 years, by Aboriginal and Torres Islander status, Queensland, as at 30 June, 2016 to 2020

Tables

DescriptionAnnualQuarterly
IPA.1: Children subject to intervention with parental agreement, by Aboriginal and Torres Islander status, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 13 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB) Excel (XLSX, 18 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB)
IPA.2: Children subject to intervention with parental agreement, by region, Queensland Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB) Excel (XLSX, 19 KB) Excel (CSV, 2 KB)

What is intervention with parental agreement?

An intervention with parental agreement (IPA) case is opened following an assessment by the department that parents are able and willing to work actively with the department to meet the protection and care needs of the child. As the department is working actively with the family on this basis, the use of a court order is not required.

Intervening with parents’ agreement enables the department to provide support and assistance to the family, and assist to develop or maintain a Safety and Support Network to increase the likelihood that the parents will be able to meet the protection needs of a child once the intervention has been completed. The child’s participation should be ascertained and encouraged during the intervention if possible. It is generally of a short-term and intensive nature, and it is usual for the child to remain at home for all, or most of, the investigation and/or intervention period.

The level of risk to a child is one factor in determining whether intervening with the parents’ agreement is appropriate.

Why this topic is important

The department seeks to implement strategies to ensure the safety of the child or young person, whilst maintaining their sense of belonging and wellbeing.  The department acknowledges that families are best placed to care for children, and when safe to do so, working with parental agreement means families are provided with the services they require to meet their needs and their children’s needs.

Intervening with parents’ agreement is considered to be one of those strategies as its purpose is to work voluntarily with a family to protect the child.

As at 30 June 2020, there were 1,988 children subject to an IPA, representing 15.1 per cent of all children subject to ongoing intervention (13,152). The number of children subject to an IPA decreased by 5.1 per cent from 2,095 as at 30 June 2019 to 1,988 as at 30 June 2020.

Of the 1,988 children subject to IPA as at 30 June 2020, 808 were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (40.6 per cent) and 1,180 were non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (59.4 per cent).

Over the past five years the number of children subject to an IPA has increased by 2.6 per cent from 1,937 as at 30 June 2016 to 1,988 as at 30 June 2020.